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By ProgBlog, Jan 31 2016 10:18PM

The Steven Wilson gig did not disappoint. It helped that I had a front row seat, pretty much centre stage (courtesy of Neil with his hyper-quick responses when booking opened) and though Craig Blundell was obscured behind his drum kit, this was a view as good as it gets. Being so close to the stage had the slight disadvantage of not getting the best sound balance; the mixing desk was at the back of the stalls so I imagine that was where you’d experience the perfect listening environment. Ian Bond, veteran front-of-house sound man did a pretty good job for the front row, too, because the only difficulties we had with the sound were a rather quiet Adam Holzman Moog and some indistinct bass, though the latter may have been a venue-wide problem because Nick Beggs was making full use of a range of 5 string instruments; needless to say Wilson’s guitar, from his Bad Cat amp and cabinet placed directly in front of us, was crystal clear. It was satisfying that they played the entire Hand.Cannot.Erase, including the short Transience which had been omitted from the UK shows following the album’s release. After the intermission we were treated to a range of other Wilson material from Porcupine Tree to Storm Corrosion (the dark, haunting but brilliant Drag Ropes) plus, as a tribute to the recently departed David Bowie, Space Oddity which was filmed on a series of Go Pro cameras. There was also an outing for half of his new album 41/2, a collection of five songs that didn’t quite make it on to either Raven or H.C.E, not because of a perceived lack of quality, rather that they didn’t quite fit in with the feel of those albums, plus a reworked Don’t Hate Me, originally recorded by Porcupine Tree that appeared on Stupid Dream (1999). Theo Travis supplied flute and saxophone for the original release and his contribution was covered by keyboards and guitar when the piece was played live. The 41/2 version includes Travis plus singer Ninet Tayeb and live, without Travis but with its trippy Floyd-inspired lengthy spaced-out middle section, was one of the highlights of the evening. Tayeb, who was guest vocalist on a number of songs, is such an incredible talent she’s still able to add an extra dimension to the stellar-quality line-up of the Steven Wilson band. It seemed somehow appropriate that she should sing on Don’t Hate Me which utilised eastern scales.



Steven Wilso ticket 27th January 2016
Steven Wilso ticket 27th January 2016

During an interview for The Pedal Show before the Bristol gig a couple of days earlier, Wilson described himself as approaching the sound from a producer’s perspective, hinting that his musical ability wasn’t perhaps in the same class as his band. This could be cited as an example of classic English reserve, for Wilson is an undoubted talent, but I’ve heard this statement before, in the same context, from Italian bassist Fabio Zuffanti. There are quite a number of parallels between Wilson and Zuffanti though apart from in his native Italy, Zuffanti has not really been recognised as a major force in modern progressive rock.

I saw Zuffanti and his Z band when Jim Knipe and I attended the Prog Résiste convention in Soignies in April 2014, showcasing his latest solo effort La Quarta Vittima but also playing songs from a back catalogue of 20 years in the music business; extracts from the Soignies performance are available to view on YouTube (Rainsuite https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y6Dlf3HmzAc is a good example.) It was at the post-performance interview, fortunately carried out in English, that someone suggested a parallel with Steven Wilson and Zuffanti, in a self-depreciating manner, suggested that he wasn’t in the same calibre as his band-mates. What he revealed at this interview were his thoughts on his musical projects. He suggested that if Quarta Vittima was going to be compared to Wilson’s The Raven That Refused to Sing (which had been released a few months before, and which Zuffanti obviously felt was the pinnacle of Wilson’s output at that time, Höstsonaten were the equivalent of the Enid, with a very symphonic palette. Though Porcupine Tree was on hiatus at the time, the inference was that PT was the primary vehicle for Wilson’s music, rather like La Maschera di Cera was for Zuffanti.



Though I was aware of other Zuffanti projects, at the beginning of 2014 I only had Maschera di Cera albums and the first Finisterre album (Finisterre, 1995). I’d bought LuxAde (2006) for £6 from Beanos second-hand store in February 2009, without listening to it, based on the instrumentation and the fact it was produced by PFM drummer Franz di Cioccio. I hadn’t appreciated that this was a band revisiting the Orpheus saga (c.f. Focus and Eruption) but it remains one of the best buys I’ve ever made; when I got home and checked my Progressive Rock Files, even before listening to it, it was evident that I had acquired something special. I wasn’t disappointed because the recording is as close as you can get to classic 70s Italian prog; analogue instrumentation including some excellent fuzz bass, symphonic scope and operatic vocals, all executed with consummate skill. I was so impressed I began looking for Maschera di Cera albums on every subsequent trip to Italy but for some reason I couldn’t locate any and finally plumped for a download of their second album Il Grande Labirinto (2003) from Amazon in 2010, describing it in an Amazon review as a Fragile to the Close to the Edge of LuxAde (some of the details turned out to be not quite right!):


“...Il Grande Labirinto is their second album, and with no Italian trip scheduled for a while, I had to indulge in the mp3 download. (When I'm next in Italy I'm going to seek out and buy the CD for myself and two prog-minded brothers.) This release is slightly less musically mature than Lux Ade - kind of like the relationship between Fragile and Close to the Edge - almost perfect but not quite.

The musical territory is classic 70s Italian prog. PFM are an obvious comparison, though La Maschera di Cera are less jazz-influenced. Some of the keyboard trills sound like early Genesis, and there's a Wakeman-sounding synth line or two. My favourite passage is the final section of the 22 minute 37 second long Il Viaggio Nell'oceano Capovolto Parte 2 (Voyager to the Inverted Ocean) that builds up from a haunting gentle woodwind melody that reminds me of Islands-era King Crimson.

Did anyone think prog was dead? Think again, and invest in this great album.”


As soon as I’d heard the band were going to do a companion piece to Felona e Sorona (1973) by Le Orme, entitled Le Porte del Domani (2013) released in both Italian and English versions (The Gates of Tomorrow), I had to buy both mixes; the Italian version was my album of the year.

I hadn’t really formed an opinion about the music of Finisterre other than I liked it and it seemed not quite fully formed. Tracks seemed to be truncated mid-flow which left me feeling slightly dissatisfied. I bought In Limine (1996) when I went to the Riviera Prog Festival in 2014 where Zuffanti, in his home city of Genoa, was wandering around chatting to friends and fans on the first day. The title track of that album was one of the pieces played by the Z band in Soignies. I bought In ogni luogo (1998) and La Meccanica Naturale (2005), both in cardboard gatefold sleeves from Galleria del Disco in Florence later in 2014 and have now come to the conclusion that Finisterre was a band for trying out ideas. Back in Soignies I bought both La Quarta Vittima and Höstsonaten’s live version of The Rime of the Ancient Mariner (2013) from Zuffanti’s merchandise stand and then also from the same shop in Florence, Höstsonaten’s Winterthrough (2005.) It’s true that Höstsonaten are symphonic; the music is layered and melodic and Ancient Mariner, performed with dancers, was a modern opera.

There was no full concert recording of the Z band so late in 2014 Zuffanti and his collaborators recorded the material they’d been playing during their live set, live in the studio, releasing Il Mondo Che Era Mio at the end of the year. My copy was bought early in 2015 and it is a faithful reproduction of the Z band live experience, a mixture of dynamics, strong melodies and classic-sounding instrumentation.

Last year I spent a family long weekend in Milan and came across the excellent Rossetti Records, and amongst my haul I bought Il giorno sottile (2001), by the rather obscure Zuffanti project Quadraphonic. This represents Zuffanti at his most experimental, producing an interesting and challenging album of industrial music and electronica, heavily reliant on loops, which at times is bleak though it does retain the memory of melody.

Zuffanti seems to be at the centre of the vast Genoa prog scene. When Francesca Francesca Zanetta, guitarist with Unreal City, was interviewed after their performance at the Riviera Prog Festival, she thanked Zuffanti for helping the band (he produced their debut album La Crudeltà Di Aprile, 2013) and another band he seems to have helped, who also appeared at the same festival, were Il Tempio delle Clessidre and most recently he’s collaborated with keyboard player Stefano Agnini from La Coscienza di Zeno, a band who played at both Soignies and at the Riviera Prog Festival in 2014. This project, under the title of La Curva di Lesmo, features a cast of the new wave of Italian prog and the music ranges from out and out symphonic prog to some traditional-sounding Italain music, taking in folk and electronica on the way. I bought a heavyweight white vinyl copy to play on my new Rega RP3 and the cover, by legendary artist Guido Crepax, harks back to Nuda (1972) by Garybaldi, in a similar manner to Maschera di Cera using artwork by Lanfranco for Le Porte del Domani, after Le Orme’s cover for Felona e Sorona, an album also released in English with lyrics by Peter Hammill.



Zuffanti shares with Wilson an appreciation for the origins of the genre (including a love of Mellotron) but they also choose to work with a range of other musicians which informs their style, seeking out different avenues for their talents. Wilson is now a global star; I’m just waiting for Zuffanti to get the full recognition he deserves.







By ProgBlog, Aug 16 2015 08:59PM

It may be the largest seaport in Italy, served by several cruise lines, but Genova is hardly geared up for tourism. I first visited the city in May 2014 for the Riviera Prog Festival but was intrigued by the UNESCO World Heritage designation for the largest medieval city centre in Europe including the Palazzi dei Rolli. This vertical city also has some unusual modes of transport. Your 100 minute ticket (€1.60) is good for the Metro, local train services, the bus and elevators and a funicular railway. The lifts are incredible – I couldn’t quite believe the map last year when I saw ‘ascensore’ marked and I somehow managed to walk right past one; last week, when I went for a return visit with my wife Susan, I made sure we used them. There’s even a Starship Enterprise-like lift that travels horizontally for some distance before ascending – possibly the only example of its kind in the world.

It seems appropriate that Genova should host an annual prog festival though it’s actually a music festival associated with a musical equipment fair held in the Fiera, the exhibition centre reclaimed from the sea in the 1960s.

Last year the excellent Black Widow Records (Via del Campo 6R) had decamped to the prog festival leaving the shop closed but on our first afternoon we somehow managed to make the pilgrimage to what I can only describe as one of the best record stores I’ve ever visited. Small in area but filled with vinyl and CDs, owner Massimo Gasperini is a fountain of knowledge and also friends with a number of musicians. He may not have been quite prepared for the Englishman who came into his shop and encouraged by his wife, began to select a rather large pile of CDs. Rather than having the CDs themselves accessible, Massimo has saved space by displaying four CD covers in plastic wallets the size of a vinyl album. It also meant that the storage racks could be uniform; a system I’d previously seen in Rossetti Records in Milan. On former trips I’d taken lists or one of my Progressive Italiano books but the gaps in my collection are becoming fewer and fewer and I now recognise what I want to acquire without too much trouble. The gaps that do exist are generally more recent album releases, bands that formed or reformed during the third wave of progressive rock and these 90s onwards groups aren’t all covered in my books. I have to rely on engaging the shopkeeper in conversation, mostly in English because my Italian is very basic, using a shared appreciation of the music itself. I was both surprised and impressed to see a copy of Marsbeli Kronikak by Hungarian symphonic prog band Solaris. Initially released in 1984, this is a highly regarded piece of work and somewhat difficult or expensive to come by in the UK. When I last checked my Amazon wish list it was selling for £43; I bought it there and then for €17. It really is a well-crafted melodic piece of work, spoiled only by some harmonica on the last of the two bonus tracks.

An old release from 1973 that I’d not previously come across in any of my travels was Melos by Cervello, the only record they produced before breaking up. I was aware that there was no keyboard player in the band but there’s plenty of flute and they utilise some interesting dynamics; the entire concept is based around Greek myths which is enhanced by a strong Mediterranean feel.

I saw Il Tempio delle Clessidre at the Riviera Prog Festival last year and was impressed enough to buy their first CD and a T shirt from their merchandise stand. I’d previously seen a review of their 2013 album Alienatura in Prog Magazine but I’d not actually seen it other than at the music festival. They’re a Genova band and their material is released on Black Widow Records so it wasn’t too much of a surprise to pick it up in the shop!

I’ve now seen La Coscienza di Zeno twice, on the second day of Prog Résiste last year in Soignies and again the following month, once more in Genova. I think I preferred the Genova set more, possibly because I’d heard the material which has some neat hooks but can also be quite rhythmically complex. A lack of ready cash and a shortage of luggage space meant I didn’t buy anything on either of these occasions but I couldn’t resist buying Sensitivita (2013) this time.

I’d resisted buying Latte e Miele records until I got a copy of Passio Secundum Mattheum from 1972 on a day trip to Padova from Venezia late last year. I‘d originally been put off by suggestions that the members of the group were inspired by religion but found the music and musicianship quite incredible, genuine classic Italian prog and anyway, rather religion than dodgy right-wing politics. I’ve been looking out for Marco Polo Sogni e Viaggi from 2009 but Black Widow had Passio Secundum Mattheum The Complete Work which is a 2014 remake of the original album, extended and rearranged and released on the Black Widow label – Latte e Miele being another Genovese group. It’s interesting to see the list of narrators who appear on the album, a list that includes other Genovese and some of the greats from the original RPI scene.

I’ve been a Goblin fan for some years and managed to find a copy of the eponymous Cherry Five album, which I like a great deal, in Pisa a couple of years ago. I was delighted that a reformed Cherry Five had just released Il Pozzo dei Giganti which is based on Dante’s Inferno, on the Black Widow label. It’s quite clear they’ve picked up from where they left off in the 70s; not only is it thematically Cherry Five material but the analogue keyboard sounds are very fitting.

Finally, Massimo produced a CD that wasn’t in the racks and asked if I was interested: Palepolitana by Osanna, the just-released reinterpretation of Palepoli from 1972 by the current line-up. I explained that I was a big fan of the original album but less impressed by their later material; Landscape of Life (1975) has two great tracks but the line-up was in transition for that album and the remaining material is really very throwaway. Massimo told me that the original Palepoli was supposed to have been a double album and the current group had not only recreated the material released in 1972 but included the songs that would have made up the other LP in the proposed double album, described as “an act of love for the city of Naples...” There are hints of the very early material, the Mediterranean feel mixed with psychedelia but I still prefer the three tracks Ora Caldo, Stanza Citta and Animale senza Respira which continue to reveal surprises.

That’s my advert for the Genoa tourist board. I've not mentioned one other of the Genova greats: La Maschera di Cera. I've got all their albums apart from Petali di Fuoco (2010) plus a considerable number of albums by Fabio Zuffanti. Coincidentally, Genova featured in the travel section of The Guardian this weekend http://www.theguardian.com/travel/2015/aug/14/italy-genoa-food-drink-chocolate-walking - it was as though I was still there...



By ProgBlog, Feb 1 2015 11:42PM

The lack of availability of Jumbo (progressivo Italiano) albums forced me to buy a download of DNA, the first of their two classic albums. I’d seen vocalist-guitarist-songwriter Alvaro Fella performing with Consorzio Acqua Potabile at the Riviera Prog festival in Genova last year and despite my decision to miss the CAP set when I went off in search of food, the loose organisation meant that I actually caught a fair amount of their performance. Fella, now confined to a wheelchair, had been signing copies of Jumbo CDs all day and when I went to see if I could buy one, either DNA or Vietato al minora di 18 anni? (Prohibited to minors under 18?) from one of the many diverse CD and record stalls, there were none available. Recent trips to Tuscany and the Veneto also failed to turn up copies.

DNA represents fairly basic RPI but it’s still quite enjoyable. There’s not a great deal of variation in the keyboard with only organ and piano but, like quite a lot of progressivo Italiano, there’s a hefty dose of Ian Anderson inspired flute plus some melodic early-Crimson like flute. Fella’s vocals might be something of an acquired taste – he has a distinctive theatrical style that has hints of Alex Harvey or Roger Chapman from Family. DNA was Jumbo’s first foray into a progressive sound but there’s still a weighty reminder of their past influences, including far too much harmonica for my liking. However, Ed Ora Corri (And now you have to run) which is the second part of the 3-part composition that makes up side one of the original vinyl LP (Suite per il Sig K., a track that reflects a Kafka-like existence) is quite spacey and seems to have been at least partially inspired by Pink Floyd.

Considering the widespread employment of the instrument in Italian prog, flute isn’t really very prevalent in classic UK prog. Tull, perhaps because of their longevity are one of the bands that immediately spring to mind when you think of prog and flute though Ian Anderson’s instrumental contributions are almost exclusively flute and acoustic guitar; his guitar parts not really providing much other than rhythm or chords for backing other instruments, including his flute. Most other prog flute is provided by band members who have a different, primary role: Thijs van Leer plays keyboards; Andy Latimer plays guitar; Peter Gabriel is a vocalist.

I’ve seen Focus a few times in recent years and once in the 70s on the Mother Focus tour. Though van Leer is probably most easily recognised for his yodelling on Hocus Pocus, it’s his organ and flute work that helps to define the Focus sound (Jan Akkerman’s guitar is obviously key but that has been accurately replicated by Niels van der Steenhoven and, more recently, by Menno Gootjes.) Van Leer plays both instruments at the same time! The Camel track Supertwister from 1974’s Mirage is allegedly named after Dutch band Supersister. I can believe this tale because the two groups toured together and the Camel song does sound rather like a Supersister composition, where flute was provided by Sacha van Geest. Latimer plays a fair amount of flute on early Camel albums (from Mirage to Rain Dances) but the incorporation of ex-Crimson and current Crimson woodwind-player Mel Collins into the band, certainly for live performances, reduced Latimer’s flute playing role and when Collins ceased working with the band, which turned more commercial around the 80s, the flute all but disappeared. Peter Gabriel’s flute is predominantly used in pastoral-sounding passages; it’s delicate and sometimes seems to border on the faltering but comes to the fore in Firth of Fifth. It’s odd to think that the instrument works perfectly well on the grittier, urban-like Lamb Lies Down and solo album Peter Gabriel 1.

Ray Thomas of the Moody Blues was one of the only examples of a dedicated flautist within a band (who also undertook some lead vocal duties) and there were groups, like King Crimson, where multi-instrumentalists played saxophone, flute and keyboards. Dick Heckstall-Smith of Colosseum was a sax player who dabbled in a bit of flute but the best example of a classic British prog band where sax and flute alternate as lead instruments is Van der Graaf Generator. David Jackson stands apart in this respect; he’s a soloist on both instruments, heavily informed by Roland Kirk. The Jackson sax is undeniably an integral part of the VdGG sound, partly through his innovative use of effects, but his flute is also sublime, floating in the calm before the inevitable full-on VdGG maelstrom.

Jimmy Hastings deserves a special mention. He was the go-to flautist for a wide variety of Canterbury bands, most notably Caravan (where brother Pye plays guitar) but he also contributed to material as diverse as Bryan Ferry’s solo work and Chris Squire’s Fish out of Water. It’s the Canterbury connections that run the deepest, adding to the jazz feel of the genre and making important contributions to Hatfield and the North and National Health albums. Canterbury alumni Gong have also utilised sax/flute, originally played by Didier Malherbe and more recently by Theo Travis. Travis has recorded with Robert Fripp and is currently part of Steven Wilson’s (solo material) band.

The idea of the ‘guest’ flautist in a band spreads to Steve Hackett who has utilised the talents of both his brother John and, more recently, Rob Townsend. Flute is required for covering some of the early Genesis material but Hackett’s solo work, from Voyage of the Acolyte (1975) to Momentum (1988) with the exceptions of Highly Strung (1983) and Till We Have Faces (1984) all feature flute.

The overblowing that characterises a great deal of Jethro Tull flute was adopted by many nascent RPI bands who were shifting from Beat music to a blues-inflected progressive rock and this contrasts with the more melodic approach exemplified by the Ian McDonald-era King Crimson that influenced PFM. Flute is integral to the symphonic prog sound and for those bands without a flautist, there was always the flute setting on a Mellotron – a great sound but quite distinct from the woodwind instrument itself! It may be that the musical heritage of Italy means that a flautist is likely to be involved in a progressivo Italiano act; there certainly seem to be more groups with flute than without, unlike the 70s scene in the UK. I’m personally in favour of a broad sonic palette and I believe that flute provides an appropriate melodic medium. I intend to learn to play the instrument in my impending retirement.



By ProgBlog, Aug 18 2014 09:13PM

My first ‘festival’ was quite far removed from the mud, tents and portaloos of Reading or Glastonbury. It’s not that I don’t like camping under canvas or some more waterproof and lighter-weight man-made equivalent, having spent a good portion of my youth walking around the Lake District bagging Wainwrights from improvised mountain campsites; it’s not particularly my idea of fun being in a muddy field packed with mostly drunk individuals listening to music that I’d prefer not to have to pay lots of money to listen to. Five or so people camping on a mountain requires some physical effort and allows you to appreciate the beauty of the natural world; Camping out for a music festival with tens of thousands of others does not.

Actual 84 was a Camden arts festival and my attendance set the general pattern for my favoured form of festival attendances in the future; genre-specific acts in small indoor venues. The main exception to this was the High Voltage festival in 2010, although there was still no camping involved; the trip from Croydon to Victoria Park involved a fairly easy commute on the recently opened Croydon branch of the London Overground. High Voltage had three stages and I, along with my brother Richard and prog-mate Gina Franchetti, set down in front of the Prog stage, only moving to the main stage at a time appropriate for getting a place that would provide a good view of Sunday headliners ELP.

The variety of bands that sign up to a festival and the relative narrowness of my musical tastes mean that there is inevitably an opportunity to do other things than simply listen to music, some of which, despite a billing on the prog stage, was not really progressive rock. Argent, Magnum and Uriah Heep, I’m talking about you.

The requirement for sponsorship and high ticket prices lend the big festivals a corporate feel. Glastonbury may be an exception though having never been I can’t say; Glasto obviously has ‘alternative’ leanings but the notion of the megastar headline act seems to me to be a betrayal of the founding principles. The High Voltage circus was quite unlike the previous big outdoor event I’d been to, a fund-raiser for anti-apartheid organisation The Lincoln Trust, featuring Peter Gabriel. This Selhurst Park concert in July 1983 was not at all corporate but, by its very nature, supporting a charity conceived after the death of Stephen Biko, was borderline political and certainly awareness-raising. I noticed the first signs of corporate-creep on the Division Bell tour where the tour programme revealed a sponsorship by Volkswagen; the Floyd invited partners along to ensure the smooth running of the show from a financial perspective and, in return, some of the magic would rub off on VW.

As the generation brought up on rebellious rock reached middle age and achieved a level of respectability that went hand-in-hand with a fair amount of disposable income, the music industry itself had been changing in a response to the adulation of the markets, de-regulation and the unfortunate loss of the founding ideals of progressive rock. The invention of the compact disc format in the mid-80s tied in nicely with Best Of, reissues and retrospectives that involved barely any financial outlay from the labels but which generated massive profit.

The sponsorship of mature, rock acts is fairly safe. The target audience know what they’re getting so potential financial backers are able to decide if their product fits in with that notion. Orange amplification back a number of events but the High Voltage sponsorships were overtly lifestyle-targeted; respectable but hinting at former rebellion like Harley Davidsons and mid-life crises. One brand associated with Classic Rock and, by extension, High Voltage, was Smokehead whisky which took the opportunity to launch what they described as “a new edgy advertising campaign, playing on the brand's growing rock credentials and rising popularity.” Their Marketing Director commented: "Combining its adventurous and modern packaging, with a rich rollercoaster of challenging flavours, Smokehead defies conformity and what people would traditionally expect from an award-winning Single Malt Whisky. Smokehead is powerful, intense and not for the faint hearted. The perfect match for a Classic Rock lover." That’s the kind of thing that makes me think marketing is a load of absolute, meaningless rubbish.

High Voltage was deeply impersonal, where individuality was crushed and you were encouraged to go along with the crowd. It therefore compares very unfavourably with the three festivals I’ve been to this year, Prog Résiste, the Riviera Prog Festival and Resonance, all of which were more egalitarian and dialogue between fans and fans, fans and sponsors, and fans and musicians was encouraged. I learned some time ago that sponsors are crucial to the success of an event. I was responsible for liaison between trade and my professional body for the BSHI conference in London in 1998 and without their financial support, the conference could not have happened. Bands can’t exist without financial input from the public and the presence of musicians at their own merchandise stands is recognition of the importance of the two-way relationship. I think this relationship, the willingness of artists to meet with audience members, has stemmed from the requirement to play smaller venues because the bands are either no longer able to fill large of medium-sized halls, or commit to tours without truckloads of equipment to ensure profitability. The intimate nature of some of these venues breaks down any barriers between performers and the paying public and merchandise can prove to be quite lucrative. My first experience of a pre-planned merchandise signing was at the King Crimson Nightwatch playback at the Hotel Intercontinental in London in September 1997. I’d been at the Epitaph playback six months earlier but lacked the nerve to get my freshly acquired 4CD set signed on that occasion. The playbacks were fairly intimate with ticket-only entry, and you were asked to bring a cake that you’d baked yourself! A feature of the Prog Résiste and Riviera Prog festivals was the question and answer sessions with the bands. That’s something I can’t see happening at High Voltage.

When it boils down to it, I like my festivals to be comfortable. I’m a firm believer in ensuring that any environment I use for teaching is comfortable for those listening. I don’t think I could take in music I’d never heard before if I was getting drenched and surrounded by mud and idiots; that would be a waste of time and money.


By ProgBlog, May 25 2014 06:31PM

I booked a direct flight from Gatwick to Genova, on British Airways, at a sensible time in the morning. What could be a better start to a weekend of Italian prog (16 - 18 May 2014) than that? It’s a shame trains from East Croydon were not running as smoothly as perhaps they should have but I managed to make check-in with a couple of minutes to spare. The flight was short and relatively comfortable but, though the airport at Genova is only 7km from the city, there’s no metro or train to take you there. There is a bus which takes about 40 minutes but they’re at odd times and so, starting from Croydon at 7.20 in the morning, I eventually reached my hotel, the NH Plaza, at a little after 2pm local time.

I was drawn to Genoa because it seems to be the new home of progressivo Italiano. It’s the biggest port in Italy and is a major point of entry into Europe so, like prog, the city is open to a variety of influences. Armed with a map that I picked up from the airport tourist information I set off for the Fiera di Genova, an exhibition space that’s more accustomed to international boat shows and which sits like a grounded UFO in an industrial estate. The route I took, including a couple of minor inadvertent diversions, revealed the city to be built on a number of levels and I could look out from a bridge to see parapets above and below me like a scene from an Escher painting. Getting down to the coast to the Fiera entrance involved a fairly circuitous route but a set of steps on the road level above the exhibition area allowed me to cut off a huge curve in the road. I thought it remarkable that a three day pass to the event cost less than €33 but this wasn’t simply a prog festival, it was an international fair dedicated to music in all its forms so the trade stands will have helped to subsidise the event. I thought that was an exceptionally reasonable price for 23 RPI acts including some big names in the progressivo Italiano world: La Maschera di Cera; Aldo Tagliapietra; Locanda delle Fate; Alphataurus; Gianni Leone; Osanna; and Gleemen. From a single gig by an RPI band, Goblin, in February this year, I seem to have gone a bit over the top recently; four Italian bands at the Prog Résiste festival last month and now three days worth in one setting.

As I entered the site I was immediately assailed by a phalanx of DJs pumping out dance music and, interestingly, the safe sex stand. Various stages were set around the central hall, which was not in use and appeared to be undergoing some form of renovation. The prog stage was set in a car park adjacent to the upper entrances to the exhibition space but rather too close to a drum demonstration set up where at various times you could hear Blondie and Police covers. Sounds from inside the exhibition hall also filtered out; the pop tunes of a dance class and the multiple beats of a drum demonstration.

The prog acts seemed to have been organised by the staff of Black Widow Records who had closed their shop in the old town for the duration and had a stall in the exhibition centre.

The range of bands on offer meant that there were acts to suit all tastes but, having read Fabio Zuffanti's recent blog about Italian audiences and prog I should have been better prepared for what I would regard as only small gatherings in front of the stage. Though there were never less than 50 in the audience for any of the acts I watched, there can never have been more than 200 at any of the performances which, in the industrial scale of the setting, felt to me to be somewhat disappointing.

That’s not to say I didn’t enjoy the music which made me aware of some new bands. Il Tempio Delle Clessidre are a Genoese band and their drummer, Paolo Tixi featured on Fabio Zuffanti’s recent solo album La Quarta Vittima. They played melodic symphonic prog and are regarded as something of a successor to Museo Rosenbach because of the inclusion of vocalist Stefano Galifi whose voice has matured since the days of Zarathustra. Opening act Panther & C. were good symphonic prog in the mould of Steve Hackett with a very physically expressive vocalist/flautist and though Unreal City played some material that was more straight-forward rock than prog, they had a flamboyant keyboard player, Emanuele Tarasconi who played in the style of Keith Emerson. I also enjoyed Not A Good Sign who were evidently influenced by King Crimson, and Ingranaggi Della Valle who played a cross between prog and jazz rock, revealing a Mahavishnu influence. The set from La Coscienza di Zeno was better than the performance in Soignies.

Another really lovely feature of the event was that the protagonists wandered in and out of the crowd throughout the day. Fabio Zuffanti and Martin Grice were both fully in evidence on day one; Alvaro Fella, formerly of Jumbo and now confined to a wheelchair spent much of the second afternoon watching the performances and signing copies of Jumbo CDs before taking the stage with C.A.P; and I had a very pleasant chat with Richard Sinclair over a beer on the last afternoon before his appearance with Prophexy. He’s resident in southern Italy and runs a music club, offering his musical expertise in return for an annual fee of €50 which also gives you two original CDs per year. His performance with Prophexy was because they’re averse to anything in 4/4 time and they love early Caravan and Hatfield and the North. It was very nice of him to address me personally when he said “hello” to the crowd. Contact richard.sinclair@alice.it for details.

The other unforgettable part of the weekend was La Maschera di Cera performing Le Porte del Domani in full (though Zuffanti was touring his solo album in Canada), followed later that evening by Aldo Tagliapietra performing the entire Felona e Sorona.

I quite like Genova, with its UNESCO world heritage sites that I visited in the mornings before the prog started, and I haven’t seen the entire city. This means that I’ll be booking a ticket if there’s a good line-up for the festival next year.


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